Rainbow-Colored Oreo Begs Question: Should Companies Get Involved?

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By Brittney R. Villalva , Christian Post Reporter
June 27, 2012|9:07 am

The Nabisco company, a subsidiary of Kraft Foods, has drawn up a large controversy after posting a picture of a rainbow Oreo on Facebook in support of gay pride.

  • oreo
    (Photo: Facebook/Oreo)
    Rainbow colored oreo stirs controversy after being posted by company in support of gay pride.
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In 2012 President Obama declared June as gay pride month in representation of those who advocate for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. It has been declared as Gay Pride month on four other occasions in the past as well.

Pride month is usually celebrated by parades and rainbow banners which mark support for LGBT activities. Nabisco however, raised controversy when it decided to post a rainbow colored Oreo on Facebook with the word "Pride."

Over 200,000 Facebook users shared the photo on their own sites, and more than 34,000 people commented. The main question raised appeared to be whether or not companies should take a political stance on controversial issues.

"In my [judgment] here the problem with what Oreo, and by extension, Kraft has done is enter the political arena. If you are for or against gay marriage is truly a secondary issue," Ali Schweitzer stated in regards to the photo.

Schweitzer suggested that large company endorsement of personal issues was a poor business decision that could have far-reaching consequences on more issues than just gay pride.

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"What if Oreo decides to stamp a baby shape onto the creamy center (like [they] did with the paw print) and declare that they (Oreo) are proud defenders of life. Many people would be outraged by something like this and the life issue is a hot button issue, as is gay rights," Schweitzer stated. "While all corporations are run by mere humans with their own personal and political beliefs they are best kept to themselves. That way everyone can continue to be happy with the products they love."

Some Christians charged that the company was supporting a gay agenda. Eric G Smith believes that "it is a Christian's right to disagree."

"But, that is after all the homosexual agenda, to make everyone agree, and if they don't they are a bigot," Smith stated.

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