Porn Industry Under Fire: Worldwide Crackdown Begins (VIDEO)

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By Christine Thomasos , Christian Post Reporter
January 3, 2012|9:28 am

While pornography has been proven to impact the sexual choices of teenagers, some changes have taken place within the industry to prevent its negative affects – with countries like Bangladesh imposing strict punishment against offenders.

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Pornographic videos have proven to be troublesome for teenagers, who are five times more likely to take part in group-sex after watching the obscene footage, a Boston University School of Public Health study showed.

Dr. Kenneth Ryan, author of Finding Your Prince, spoke to The Christian Post about the impact of pornography on teenagers and mass culture.

“We are obviously affected by what we watch, otherwise, why spend a million dollars on a Super Bowl commercial,” Ryan asked. “Sexual images tend to stick even more securely in our brains than Dorito dust in a football ad.”

In Bangladesh, however, authorities are not giving the sexual messages and images an opportunity to embed themselves in the brains of teenagers or other citizens. The Muslim-majority country is cracking down on the industry, after female celebrities have started appearing in vulgar videos against their knowledge recently, BBC reported.

Shorful Alam, CEO of Aamra Network Ltd, an IT firm in Dhaka, spoke about the government’s battle to stop the technology driven pornographic industry.

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“The government has the technology to track the Internet addresses of the suspects, " Alam said in a BBC report. "But those involved in the porn business tend to be smarter and a step ahead of the officials."

While offenders of the Bangladesh pornography law could face up to 10 years in prison for violating, North American authorities are still trying to figure out ways to minimize the exposure of pornography to those underage.

Det. Greg Loebach, a member of the Windsor police child exploitation unit, said recent reports have been filed concerning the public viewing of lewd videos.

“We’ve had a couple instances in the last week, including this one at Chapters, where we’ve had people in public areas using laptops to access pornography,” Loebach said in the National Post report.

Still, Loebach was forced to recognize that there were no laws in place preventing the viewing of pornography publicly.

“There are some charges that loosely fit it, but nothing specific to that yet,” said Loebach. “I don’t know if the politicians and legislators are coming up with something like that. I don’t know what’s in the works that way.”

Despite the lack of laws preventing the viewing of pornography in public places, Ryan said parents could still do their part in eliminating porn at home.

“Parents need to understand that our culture is pounding it into their heads that porn is no big deal. Parents have a big job to counter the cultural message about both porn and sex,” Ryan said. “A single awkward ‘sex talk’ will certainly not cut it in today's environment. Sex and relationships needs to be an ongoing discussion with tweens and teens.”

The Christian Post Daily Report 01.03.12
The Christian Post Daily Report 01.03.12

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