Kim Jong Un to 'Prep for War'? Dictator Orders Military to Be Ready for Imminent Conflict

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  • Kim Jong-un
    (Photo: Reuters/KRT via Reuters TV)
    North Korea's new leader Kim Jong-un looks on during the memorial for late North Korean leader Kim Jong-il in Pyongyang, in this still image taken from video December 29, 2011.
By Myles Collier, Christian Post Contributor
December 27, 2013|2:08 pm

Reports indicate that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is warning his military to prepare for a war that could occur and any moment and conflict that could arise "without prior notice."

The 29-year-old dictator allegedly visited a Korean People's Army command center in the western port city of Nampo on Christmas Eve and told soldiers to be ready for combat, as reported by The New York Daily News.

"He instructed the unit to put utmost spurs on rounding off its combat readiness ... always bearing in mind that a war breaks out without any prior notice," according to the government run news agency.

The North Korean leader made the readiness call following news that the country has increased activity at a known plutonium reactor. Additional reports stated the country has two operational reactors and one close to being completed.

The Supreme Leader also made global headlines earlier this month when he publicly ordered the execution of his "traitor" uncle, Jang Song-Thaek, by firing squad. The unexpected announcement was reported by the Japanese newspaper Yomiuri Shimbun, who stated that Kim was intoxicated when he ordered the executions of Jang's aides and his uncle following a confrontation between supporters of the two men.

The country condemned Song-Thaek as "despicable human scum" and "worse than a dog." To make the developments all the more bizarre, Jang was considered to be the second most powerful man in the country behind his nephew.

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Jang's execution startled many observers of North Korea, who did not see disagreements between the two men escalating to the point where the dictator would kill his uncle.

"Only a few months ago Mr. Jang was believed to be the second most powerful man in North Korea. In fact, American intelligence agencies had reported to the White House and the State Department in late 2011 that he could well be running the country behind the scenes," read a recent report by the New York Times.

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