HIV Study in Mice Gives Hope

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  • HIV AIDS
    (Photo: AP/Haraz N. Ghanbari)
    This file photo shows a red ribbon symbolizing AIDS awareness displayed at the North Portico of the White House, Sunday, Nov. 30, 2008, in Washington.
By Benge Nsenduluka, CP Reporter
December 1, 2011|7:15 am

A recent study testing HIV prevention in Mice could finally lead Scientists to find a preventative treatment for humans.

The study which was conducted by a team at the California Institute of Technology, saw a number of Mice being protected from high doses of HIV with the use of artificial gene therapy.

Human Immunodeficiency Virus, which causes AIDS, is said to weaken a person's immune system – making them prone to infection and serious disease.

Although Mice are naturally immune from the virus, scientists were able to complete the study using mice that had human immune system cells.

According to abcnews.com, mice were injected with an antibody gene that ultimately helped them form increased levels of antibodies.

Antibodies help fight bacteria and viruses, and are naturally found in humans.

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Experts are confident that the same results will be present in humans, although this will not be confirmed until human testing begins in approximately two years.

David Baltimore, who led the study, confirmed that the research was a success for Mice but admitted, "we simply don't know what will happen in people."

The breakthrough follows recent reports that a number of HIV patients died after churches advised them to stop taking their medication.

A pastor at the Synagogue Church of all Nations (SCOAN) in Britain, reportedly tried to convince a reporter that HIV patients can be healed without medication.

Daily News quoted the pastor known only as "Pastor Holmes" as saying, "We have many people that contract HIV. All are healed."

A number of sources suggested that the church has a faith-based treatment for HIV positive churchgoers. The treatment is said to be a mixture of "exorcism-like" processes, "shouting" and "spraying water in their faces."

The church also released a statement in response to the controversial media scrutiny.

"If anybody comes in the name of God, we pray for them. The outcome of the prayer will determine if they come genuinely or not."

The first HIV related death was reported in 1981.

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