Brad Pitt's Mom Gets Death Threats, Bullied Over Opposition to Same-Sex Marriage, Obama

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  • Jane Pitt, Angelina Jolie
    (Photo: REUTERS/Carlo Allegri)
    Angelina Jolie (C) poses for photos with her partner Brad Pitt's parents Bill and Jane as they arrive at the screening of her directorial debut "In the Land of Blood and Honey" in New York December 5, 2011.
By Benge Nsenduluka, CP Reporter
July 10, 2012|3:36 pm

Jane Pitt, the mother of famed Hollywood actor Brad Pitt, has been forced into silence over a politically motivated letter she recently wrote to her local newspaper.

Mrs. Pitt, a devout Christian, is now reluctant to publicly discuss her controversial letter as well as the torrent of abuse that has followed, according to wnd.com.

In her letter to the editor of Missouri's Springfield News-Leader, Mrs. Pitt urged the public to vote for Republican Presidential candidate Mitt Romney who she described as being a "family man" with "high morals" as opposed to voting for President Barack Obama.

Mrs. Pitt went on to call the President "a liberal who supports the killing of unborn babies and same-sex marriage," and requested "prayerful consideration" from fellow Christians as they select who they vote for in November.

A number of critics flocked to social networking site Twitter after Mrs. Pitt's letter was publicized. They threatened and condemned Mrs. Pitt for vocalizing her opinion and she is now said to be trembling with fear and in despair.

"BRAD PITT'S MOM WROTE AN ANTI-GAY PRO-ROMNEY EDITORIAL. KILL THE b----,' a user posting under the name I Bleed Gaga tweeted.

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"f--- you, brad pitt's mom. the gay community made your kid a star, you whacko," karengeier tweeted.

"Brad Pitt's mom, die," Sandy Kownacka tweeted.

Brad, 48, who is renowned for openly supporting the LGBT community and President Obama, has not publicly addressed his mother's letter. The actor's brother Doug Pitt however, recently spoke out about his mother's political views on the "Today Show" during an interview with Matt Lauer.

"Moms and dads and kids agree to disagree all over the world, so why would our family be any different?" Pitt said.

"There can be healthy discussion when people disagree with you, and I think there should be. The bad thing is when it turns into venom and negativity, and we don't have that in our family. It's open discussion; we can learn from each other … maybe you learn something," he added.

READ: INTOLERANT TOLERANCE - A PEVERTED POLITICALLY CORRECT AGENDA

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